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CORSICA

GEOGRAFIJA - GEOGRAPHY (TAFONI)

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Boštjan Burger

Filitosa

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virtual excursion

Boštjan Burger, geografske vizualizacije

Filitosa

is a megalithic site in southern Corsica, France. The period of occupation spans from the end of the Neolithic era and the beginning of the Bronze Age, until around the Roman times in Corsica.
The site was discovered in 1946 by the owner of the land, Charles-Antoine Cesari. Systematic excavations started in 1954 by Roger Grosjean. Finds of arrow heads and pottery date earliest inhabitation to 3300 BC. Around 1500 BC, 2-3 metre menhirs were erected. They have been carved with representations of human faces, armour and weapons. It is thought the menhirs may have been erected to ward off an invasion of a group of people called the Torréens (Torreans). However this was unsuccessful: the menhirs were cast down, broken up and reused in some cases as building material by the Torréens. The Torréens built circular stone structures on the site, known as torri (or torre), which may have been used as temples. The torri are remarkably well preserved.

In total, about twenty menhirs of various times were counted in Filitosa. They constitute approximately half of the total staff of these monuments in Corsica. (source: wikipedia, April 8th 2014)

The area is also geomorphologically interesting with the formations of tafoni.

Uvod - Prologue

(c) Boštjan Burger, (1993) 1996-2018